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as we've been reporting all afternoon, jim. you saw the pictures coming out of the white house. defense secretary chuck hagel, cia director john brennan, talking about the situation in ukraine and discussing policy options. i should note, jim, that just outside the gates of the white house at this very moment there is a protest going on. some ukranians have gathered outside the north fence to talk about what they would like to see happen. they would like to see the u.s. get more involved. but as the hours go on, jim, i think we're going to get a clearer indication as to how this phone call went down between these two leaders. as you mentioned, they did speak a week ago friday. and you heard the president in the briefing room yesterday issuing that warning to vladimir putin that there would be costs if russia intervenes in ukraine. >> want to point out, jim, while those folks were meeting there in the white house for an emergency session in effect to discuss ukraine those pictures we just saw might explain that the president was on the phone with several world leaders including we now kn
, reporting from moscow, let's go to the white house right now, our senior white house correspondent jim acosta is standing by. jim, there were important meetings in the west wing of the white house, we saw the top national security advise scores leafing the west wing of the white house. i assume they'll be issuing a statement or someone will be going before the cameras, what are you hearing? >> reporter: and this is eerily similar to when the president was weighing whether to use military force against syria, there were some tense moments over here at the white house on some weekends as you will'll recall, wolf, and these principal meetings do occur from time to time. it does appear that one occurred this afternoon but the white house has to officially congrfi that mississippi t-- that that s the case. the chairman of the joint chiefs, martin dempsey. so it does a appear that senior officials have been meeting with the president here about this situation in ukraine. and you know, wolf, you've been talking about options a that the white house has available to it, options that the preside
voice in the room. then we have jim barrett describing the final invention. artificial intelligence and the end of the human era. and we wrap up tonight's programming at 10:45 p.m. what paul kengor, who wrote "eleven principles of a reagan conservative." that happens tonight on booktv. >> i believe we started in 1933, the day after prohibition ended. so 25 other wineries lineup of law rest. we are at the only one still in business today. oregon has a rich history for the wine industry. the wine is where we add the variety with great varietals in the 70s. so we have produced specialty wines with what is rich with fruit orchard and berries and there is kind of a grape boom and the grapes were growing and i think that the struggle but a lot of them had early on was the regulation coming in more strong for label regulations and production and all of those things. and i think that that we can get some. over the '30s, 40s and part of the 50s, customers can come in and try it. one of the neat things about this was the secretary at the time who then bought it, she actually went to lobby for
a background check. >> my name is sarah brady. i'm here on behalf of my husband , jim bair brady, who was loaded in the assassination attempt on ronald reagan in 1981. >> my name is dan gross. i'm here for my brother, matthew , who was shot in the head atop the empire state building in february of 1997. and for my dear friend, christopher burmeister, who was killed that day. and for the 90 americans who are killed every day by a bullet. and for everyone of us who just wants to live in a safer nation. today, as i said, we are here to mark the 20 year anniversary of what could fairly be called the greatest, most significant step forward toward that goal of a safer nation. the brady handgun violence prevention act, which took , andt 20 years ago today to introduce this special report that we have issued to celebrate the success of the historic legislation and to define the critical work that lies ahead, 20 years of brady background checks, the case for finishing the job to keep america safer. first, i would like to thank some of our special guests here. course, the victims and families t
correspondent jim acosta. jim, what are we expecting the president to say here? >> i think the president is going to back up secretary john kerry and other officials, including jay carney earlier this afternoon, that any moves by russia to intervene in the crisis to perhaps invade that territory of crimea would be a grave mistake, in the words of white house officials and according to secretary of state john kerry. one thing that we've been pressing officials all day long, jake, is exactly who those forces are in the crimea area. we're seeing forces with insignias that appear to be blackandover or concealed. it's not clear who is on the ground in crimea. hopefully we'll get updated information from the president as to what that is. jake, make no mistake, this is, again, once again, another confrontation between the president and vladimir putin over what is happening. those events on the ground in the ukraine. >> let's bring in chief national correspondent jim sciutto. i was e-mailing with a senior official who points out that the russians have a base and the question is whether what they
their pierce. >> jim capretta, what do you think the president is doing or not doing to close the gap? >> i think the budget is aimed at a political statement, not a legislative change. i don't think there is a chance the many proposals will be enacted. it's a political argument the democrats can carry into the november election. the white house all be admitted that's their aim with this kind of budget. back to the issue of inequality. there is a misunderstanding of how inequality came about and whether or not it affects people on the low end. inequality happened because we have a global economy and if someone finds a new idea or research effort or something that's innovative, you can do very, very well in this country if you're a part of that. does that come at the expense of people at the low end? no. there have been many, many economic studies that have shown that just because somebody at the high end is doing better that doesn't come at the expense of the low end. so the president's proposal is really a prescription for the wrong problem. secondly, even if it was the right problem, the
to interaction with you then on the questions you have. i'm also very glad to see jim phillips here. i've worked on terrorism issues with jim for it must be a quarter-century now and there are very few people in the world who writes with the intelligence and prudence that jim phillips does. here are a couple of reasons why i wanted to write the book so i will start this way. i remember back in 1980 reading some clippings and newspapers. it was in the chicago area and a woman was looking out her window near her home and she saw a van pull up. in that van there proved to be some nine different people. they looked rather like an athletics team, the jogging uniforms in the bags but as she looked out her window this lady decided she should be a little nervous about this. there have been robberies in the area by a the saln who were puerto rican separatists and she noticed a few things that were odd to her. first off these athletic bag seemed much heavier than she was used to seeing with athletes and secondly some of the guys were smoking. she decided this wasn't a workout at all and she thought for a
and jim pinkerton with the best location of the day in sunny, miami, florida. good to see you. >> good to be with you. >> joe, i have to start with you. white house press secretary jay carney doubled down on this and said also this week, those stories, a lot of them turned out not to be true. is that a winning argument for the democrats? because there are millions of people waiting to tell their stories and they're not flattering. >> well, i think what -- what reed was talking about, i think, and what jay carney were talking about is a lot of the ads that were being played. most of them made for americans by process tearty to have a ton of problems with the stories they are telling. they did this thing where they showed people receiving cancellations on their policies. it turned out those were paid actors pretending that their policies had been canceled. one woman who said her premiums had gone up, back checkers gave that one pinocchio because her premiums have gone down. there's tons of problems with the ads being run out there across the country. >> that aside, harry reid did not, to
'll have more on what organizing for action chief jim messina has now told his team. >>> good morning from washington. it's tuesday, march 4th, 2014. this is "the daily rundown." >>> first reads of the morning, russian president vladimir putin went before the media this morning to defend his country's actions in the wake of the ukrainian revolution, arguing that it amounted to a coup that demanded a russian response. he he told reporters he would use force in ukraine only as a last resort, he claimed. but he said he reserves the right to do so. putin also said further military action would be justified because the ousted president, victor yanukovych has requested it. he said anything russia does would be to protect the citizens of ukraine. and he even told reporters that the soldiers currently in crimea, they're not russian soldiers at all. he called them local forces. now, responding to the united states, the russian leader shrugged off threats of diplomatic or economic punishments. meanwhile, president obama said monday that russia has a choice. >> over time, this will be a costly propos
at this hour. elise labott joins us and michael holmes and our chief national security correspondent, jim sciutto, joins us from washington. >>> first, elise, i want to speak with you. i understand john kerry has already had a brief meeting with the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov. they have had a somewhat decent relationship in the past. they are set to have a one-on-one meeting any minute now. what's the realistic goal of this meeting? >> reporter: the goal, john, is really to get russian prime minister, lavrov, to sit down with the ukrainian foreign minister. that minister flew on secretary kerry's plane last night with us from kiev to paris. he says he is really eager to sit down with the russian foreign minister. that's what all this diplomacy is about today, trying to give russia that diplomatic off ramp. they want russia and ukraine to sit down, have a dialogue along with the u.s., u.k., france, germany, members of the international community with an interest. they want to get monitors on the ground in ukraine acknowledging that russia does have these concerns in ukraine, p
an act of aggression against ukraine. what's happening now and what does it all mean? nbc's jim maceda is in moscow. bill neely is in crimea. jim, we start with you in the russian capital there. what does that approval of putin's request to use russian troops mean? >> reporter: hi, craig. you're right. it is pretty symbolic. the legislative body that putin requested that use of force from is a rubber stamp, upper house of parliament. and it doesn't mean that putin will now send in more troops into crimea. there are thousands there already all part of russia's black sea fleet. large numbers have been seen there over the past 48 hours, securing airports, government buildings, telecom towers. what the approval does mean is it's official now. russians have been mobilized in crimea. they can now all put their patches back on. and the approval of course gives putin more options. it allows him to strike not only crimea but anywhere in ukraine. and of course that spikes the tension even higher. >> jim, any word at this point on a timetable? >> reporter: not that we're aware of, no. but i can t
cost benefit analysis, ukraine is hugely important to russia. and i want to maintain high jim any over it. and these incidental sanctions can i weather them and in due course the united states and europe will back off them because they don't have staying power. i will get what they want and they won't hurt me that much. that's their calculus. what's our calculus? >> ambassador, thank you, sir. enjoy london. >> thank you. >> and general bob scales insists russian president putin is bluffing that u.s. intervention must be on the table. i will tell you most people have military fatigue and you put it on the table. >> well, first of all understand russian military forces are very weak. they don't have a draft army. not a single stealth fighter. their navy can't get out of ports. it it really is the gang that couldn't shoot straight. we have still a very strong military. we ought to leverage that asymmetry. is that a threat or actually a follow-through? there are two things there. one is a threat to sort of scare them because they have a pathetic military and the other one is to actually co
heels for a little while until the story clarifies. let's bring in our ace team. michael farr, jim iuorio and zachary karabell. gentlemen, let me go to mr. iuorio because i kind of liked what warren buffett had to say. buy farmland, by stock, by hard assets, don't buy money, i don't really think this is going to be world war ii and you don't think you do either. but in general terms, is buffett right? >> i agree, too. when he said it also he did definitely say that in times of war, which you and i both agree we're not there -- but i have been doing that over the last year and a half. diversifying into things like that. i believe that's a smart way to go. >> michael farr, do you believe it's a smart way to go? what i'm suggesting, i hope it's in line with mr. buffett. but i'm saying fundamentally this economy -- you saw it today. we had a good ism in manufacturing, maybe nobody paid attention to it because of the ukraine. we also had a pretty good personal spending and income number. nobody paid attention to that. the economy is growing at 2.5%. labor profits are so low, i don't thi
$1 billion in loan guarantees to ukraine. i'm going to turn to senior white house correspondent jim acosta. so, jim, you have both the secretary of state and president obama expressing a lot of support for ukraine today and the administration seemed to offer president putin perhaps a way out of this crisis. >> that's right, brianna. i think that's what the president and the administration has been saying all along through this, that there are these off-ramps for vladimir putin if he wants to bring in international observers to deal with some of these questions that he has about the safety of ethnic russians, which by the way the administration rejects, then bring in international observers. i will tell you we just came out of what was supposed to be a budget briefing and as you know the president was making those remarks earlier at a budget event. it just shows you how much ukraine and the events are dominating everything right now. i had a chance to ask white house press secretary jay carney about vladimir putin's claim that those are not russian troops in crimea and jay carney sai
on the budget with jim nestle and jared bernstein. great to see both of you. and look, jim, john just made this point that whether it was the proposal from congressman camp or president obama's budget, everyone is saying it's dead on arrival, you don't need to worry about it. frankly, it does feel as though we're seeing an emerging template for tax reform. in your view what could come out of this in the year or two ahead? >> you're right. if you're looking for a silver lining on a day when generally speaking you've seen the president propose what is a budget that's really not going anywhere, the silver lining is what's happening on tax reform, and it's really going to happen in the congress. the president has pretty much checked himself out of the reform process. i think the new finance chairman in the senate, senator widen, and dave camp as well as the potential of paul ryan coming to the tax committee, i think that gives us a silver lining and some hope when it comes to comprehensive tax reform. and the second item is what secretary hagel did in defense spending looking forward and sayin
anniversary of the brady handgun violence prevention act. forcontrol advocates pass expanded prevention. jim brady was shot in the head during an assassination attempt on reagan and 1981. sarah brady is the founder of the brady foundation. she is the police chief of baltimore and gun violence victims were at the spent today. >> good morning. welcome. i am the president of the brady campaign to prevent gun violence. we are very clear to be here to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the brady law and to release our new report. before we get to those things, we want to begin by showing why we're all here. why our mission is so vitally important and why we cannot ever give up. >> good morning. my name is kenny barnes. i live in washington dc. i'm a victim of senseless gun violence. this is a picture of my son. he was killed september 24, 2001. right here in washington, d.c. on the corner of 11th and u stre et northwest. >> good morning. my name is eddie. , my mother was shot to death in front of me. the gun was also turned on me. it malfunctioned. i am here today along with other victims and su
that didn't exist. >> there were accusations this was going to bring back jim crowe. i looked through the jim crowe laws of the deep south where i grew up. i couldn't find anything common to that at all in this bill. it was very minor language changes. can you help our audience understand exactly what did this bill do? >> senate bill 1062 clarified an updated arizona religious freedom restoration act as we saw courts around the country basically saying that the government wasn't a party to the lawsuit, then the religious freedom restoration act would not apply. that was the main clarification. an individual or a business could assert their religious freedom rights, whether or not the government was a party to the lawsuit so it would be intended to help the little sisters of the poor, the photographer, the wedding cake maker, hobby lobby, those businesses where the government is trying to force them to forego their religious beliefs. >> it was not discriminatory but for example if i owned a jewish dell ka teten and someone said i want you to do bacon wrapped shrimp, then i would be pro
this that is unrelated. you heard jim talk about the un envoy sent to crimea. that was threatened and not kidnapped. he is now safe and preparing to leave ukraine. several armed men threatened special envoy robert sari. they blocked him at a coffee shop. break this down for us. what happened and what kind of threat was this? how did he escape the coffee shop? >> we heard jim saying someone will get hurt. this un envoy has his diplomatic mission cut short in crimea. it just arrived. he visited a naval base and was leaving when armed men, 10 to 15 in number, not everyone with weapons surrounded him and demanded he leave crimea immediately and go to the airport. he got into the car he came with and refused to get out and the men blocked the car. they then were threatening him. he was described as shaken and not physically hurt. he walk and sought refuge. the late news is that the united nations is saying they are taking a late flight out and will return shortly to kiev to continue his mission. cut short by today's incident, the words of the united nation spokesman office here in new york. secretary genera
approved that use of force. on the phone, we have chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim, what is this very quick vote signal to you? >> reporter: i think it's the russians slow rolling an invasion of sovereign ukrainian territory, and in direct defiance of repeated public and stern warnings from u.s. officials ranging from secretary kerry, secretary hagel right up to the top, right up to the president. you saw his comments yesterday. it is a sobering development. the fact is, u.s. officials were already telling us yesterday that those masked troops on the ground as of yesterday in and around crimea were russian so now you have a public in effect acknowledgment from the russian government that the president wants to send troops in there, this authorization. i think the other point is that you can see this as an intelligence failure by the u.s. officials had been telling us in the last 48, 72 hours that it was their assessment that the russians would not go in, and here you have it happening. it is not the way they did it in georgia in 2008. you remember when russia sent t
on ukraine. let's bring in our senior white house correspondent, jim acosta. jim, the white house says it won't be sending a presidential delegation to the paralympic games in sochi, russia that, are about to begin. is this more boy costs? it looks like the g-8 summit in june the u.s. was planning on participating in, that may be gone, as well. >> reporter: that's right. and you heard secretary of state john kerry say, wolf, it may become the g-7. that russia may be expelled. want to pick up on something you were talking about with anderson cooper about that alleged ultimatum from russia to ukrainian forces about crimea. there is a state department conference call going on right now, wolf, and a state department spokeswoman, jen psaki, said they don't have any independent confirmation that ultimate yum has been issued. but if that had occurred, it would in their view constitute a dangerous escalation. so that quick response from the white house to those events, even though the russians are saying that that did not occur. you mentioned the word from the white house earlier this morning that, y
is the star of the show, your host, jim lang. >> thank you. bill: that is an american icon right there. jim lang, the long-time host of "the dating game" has left us, dying yesterday at his home in mill valley, california of a heart attack. best known for hosting "the dating game" for more than a decade. look at those guys. here we go, ladies. since 1965 he helped people pick a potential suitor in secret. celebrities like mack call jackson, steve martin, farrah fawcett all appeared on the show. he later returned to radio. his first love as morning disk jockey before retiring 80 years ago. jim lang lange was 81 years young. martha: you had that then. and hot tubs and fantasy suites. that was a much simpler time. that was first reality shows. send them on a date. tell them how the it was. bachelor number two, bill hemmer. bill: step right up. martha: obamacare has been front and center and will continue to be as we get closer to midterm elections as balance of power is back up for grabs in very real way. both sides are using the affordable care act in ad campaigns as you might imagine to atta
the deadline back two more years. well past the 2016 presidential election. tonight, jim engle tells us how the idea of controlling costs is also on life support. >> the obama administration while saying it's trying to lower health costs sometimes favors the most expensive way to provide care. take cancer treatment, for instance, where it pays hospitals far more for identical treatments than it does a multitude of community cancer centers. >> they do get paid more for doing the exact same thing, so the exact same treatments here versus the hospital are about 40% more expensive in the hospital than they are here. that affects everybody, patients' copays, the insurance carriers as well. >> not only to the taxpayers and medicare pay more when the carrikers in a hospital outpatient setting, but the patient pays more, too, and all the data suggests they pay 10% to 20% more. >> and he said the hospital gets paid twice as much for chemotherapy. for patients, it's price for convenience. >> i can come here and get my chemo within five minutes. i go to the hospital, it could be five minutes, it could
national security reporter jim sciutto is in washington. could this threat of seizing assets, could that deter the u.s. or eu from less viaing sanctions? >> reporter: it shows how quickly this could spiral into a tit for tat or unupmanship. right now they just target individuals, government officials involved in the decision to send troops into sovereign ukrainian territory. if the russians were to follow through on next step much seizing assets, you know, you have another option for the u.s. which has been discussed and brought up by republican senators, bob corker and others of sanctioning russian entities, meaning state banks, oil companies, energy companies, and that's when you start talking about real money. russia's trade, russia's very economy is dependent on access to the international finance system, its trade with europe. again europe lose as lot and that's why you're seeing opposition from the germans and british and others to more significant sanctions that have already been put on the table by the u.s. >> jim, educate our viewers. how common is it for a country that has
. [applause] i also want to mention m bassett -- i would also want to mention american ambassador jim warlick. ,fghanistan faces challenges and all of us are aware of those challenges. the odds are very much in favor of success with the bsa in place. will it be in place echo the afghan presidential candidates, a number of them i spoke to in kabul are in favor of starting ae bsa. i think it is certainty that it will be signed. whether or not karzai signs it is irrelevant. we need to make sure we plan effectively for him not signing it and moving forward. i truly hope that any of the ambassador dobbins mentioned that might occur if there is delay are mitigated effectively by the great planning capacity that our military and state department have. i don't believe there's is any need for any particular cost as long as we keep our eye on the , as is the topic of this panel. in turning to this cop -- to , is topic of afghan security have visited afghanistan 20 or 30 times and lived there for a couple of years. when andrew, alex and i were working on afghanistan in the earlier decade, the afghan di
forces military, civilian and, of course, our afghan colleagues that continue despite every day, jim, thank you very much. alex and i were saying he gave his keynote address and a what are the rest of us supposed to say? andrew asked if i would talk about reconciliation, elections and a very important topic i think, the politics of the future relationship of between afghanistan and pakistan. i would be pleased to do that but before i do, i just wanted to step back just for a moment really and make three points and asked one question. i think it's relevant to the entire conversation we're going to have today. first point, that's the one that has been emphasized here both in the fields that we saw previously and ambassador dobbins speech and the points that intimate. it's really important it seems to me when we talk about afghanistan to stop just for a moment and recognize what has been achieved. not just what has been achieved but what has been achieved at such great cost on the part of afghans, part of the united states military and civilian, and, of course, our international partner
national security correspondent, jim sciutto, is here watching all of this. it's fast-moving right now. and a lot of us didn't think it was going to get this bad. but there is potential for a whole lot worse. >> no question. that's been the consistent warning from u.s. officials. don't -- to the russians. don't do any actions that can be misinterpreted. right? and now on the ground there, you are having actions that can easily be misinterpreted. are those forces that you're seeing there supported by the russians, directed by the russians? we don't know for sure. >> are they russians? >> or are they russians, exactly. we don't know for sure, but that's exactly the kind of thing that can be misinterpreted and can further inflame the situation on the ground. >> the outgoing -- now the former u.s. ambassador in moscow, mike mcfaul, he spoke out on cnn's "new day" today, 48 hours since he left moscow, back at stanford university. but i want you to listen to what he said, because it's ominous. >> it's a very dangerous situation, extremely tense. you have soldiers with guns, very well-armed i
jim s crow. i lived through the jim crow d laws ofan the deep south where grew up. i couldn't find anything common to that at all in this bill. it was very minor language changes. so can you help our audience understand exactly what did thi bill do? >> senate bill 1062 simply clarified and updated arizona's religious freedom restoration act as we saw courts around thep country basically saying that the government, if the government wasn't a party to the lawsuit, then the religious freedom restoration act wouldn't apply. an individual or businessicate assert their religious freedom rights whether the government was a party to the lawsuit so it would help the little sisters oa the poor, the photographer, the wedding cake baker, those typesf of businesses where the government is trying to force them to forego their religious believes. >> it was not discriminatory, but if i was the owner of a j jewish delicatessen and was kosher and someone came in and said i want you to do my wedding and i want bacon wrapped shrimp andgo i said i didn't want to d that, i would be protected because the
. here's nbc's jim maceda who has more from moscow. >> reporter: putin now has his hand on the russian crown jewel. crimea gives putin an essential warm water port, and it counters in his mind the nightmare scenario. that's what he sees as an ultranationalist government suddenly cancelling russia's lease on the black see base and kiev taking control of crimea and then joining nato down the line, bringing the enemy, in his mind, right back to russia's doorstep. so vladimir putin has made that calculus, and it's now unclear just what the west can do about it. chuck, back to you. >> thank you, jim. right now, according to folks i've talked to, the u.s. has three options, none of them involve the u.s. military. the first, the u.s. could move along with european allies to officially suspend or kick russia out of the g8. that would be symbolic. second, the administration could pursue its own sanctions that target russian banks as well as international sanctions, targeting russian oil companies. third, the u.s. may convince the european union to cancel some of its energy contracts with russia
joining me now from moscow is nbc's jim maceda. jim, with a good evening to you. a lot of diplomatic salvos being tossed back and forth here. but what's happening on the ground in crimea? >> reporter: hi, alex. you're right. it's hard to keep up with them all. tonight, crimea looking pretty much neutralized. russian forces have now been moving freely around the peninsula for a couple of days because they are mostly off the streets. they and the armed vigilante groups, if you will, are in control. airport, the telecommunication towers. today as you alerted, units of russian troopser driving to various ukrainian military posts trying to persuade the ukrainian soldiers to hand over their weapons. and then surrounding the posts of those who refuse to disarm. just taking them out of operation. so despite all of the appeals that we're hearing from the united states, from kiev. from the west in general, those diplomatic salvos, as you call them, to put his forces, putin's forces back, to pull them back, crimea today effectively is in vladimir putin's hands, alex. >> okay. so, jim, the new u
burning up the phone lines lately. >> the diplomacy continuing full speed ahead. let's hope it works. jim acosta at the white house, thank you. >>> let's go to paris, our foreign affairs reporter elise lavin is there. intense meetings today. the secretary said he'd rather be where all of the action is right now as far as the diplomacy is concerned. did you get the sense that there's any ground for serious optimism right now? >> wolf, i would say cautious optimism. they didn't get that meeting between russian foreign minister lav love and the ukrainian foreign, they've been trying to get together all day kerry met with lavrov. then they sat down together. you had that call between angela merkel in which she's pitching this german/french plan that has some elements that the russians would like. tomorrow secretary kerry will go to rome and meet with foreign minister lavrov again. you have a seedling, if you will, of a diplomatic process. and everyone wants to de-escalate the situation. but i will say, wolf, the state department just sent out a fax sheet and it's called president putin's fict
1-800-quit-now. [ jim ] mmmmm. so, hot. whoo! mmmmm. that is hot! [ male announcer ] made with real cheese and premium cuts of meat. [ ding! ] ♪ hot pockets! a short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. [ male announcer ] don't miss red lobster's lobsterfest! the year's largest selection of lobster entrees like lobster lover's dream or new dueling lobster tails with one crab-stuffed tail and one topped with shrimp. hurry in and sea food differently. >> jon: that's our show. here it is your moment of zen. that's really very good. i'd like to try it just one more time and we'll call it a day. ♪ i met her on a monday and my heart stood still ♪ ♪ the do run >> stephen: tonight the winter limb picks in sochi have ended, although with nbc's tape delay, they're just beginn
bergus. gary august steen is the new executive director. nice to have you back. marine corps veteran jim now serves as dav national service director and his fellow marine corps veteran barry janowski leads as executive director of headquarters in coal spring, kentucky. very good to have you back, too. with us today is miss susan miller who was elected today office of national commander of the dav aux illry. she prefld served as a registered nurse with the veterans administration and her son, trent, is a member of the united states army, recently serving in his second deployment to afghanistan. gentlemen and miss miller, thank you for your leadership and for your service. i look forward to working with each of you in your new roles and continuing to work with those of you that are continuing in the roles that you have had for a number of years. i'd also like to recognize the dav members from my home state of florida who may be with us today. if you could just raise your hand so we can say hello. isn't this just like home? this is just like home. welcome to those from the sunshine state. w
said is really concerned. they want to iron it out in a united peaceful fashion. >> jim, talk a little bit about the concern from the perspective of the administration. russia is so key in so many discussions. you are talking about iran. you are talking about syria. so key and also such a thorn in the side of u.s. diplomacy in the u.s. reaching objectives. what does this mean for those other efforts? >> regional and global as you say. russia is central to any possible solution in syria. russia is central to the nuclear deal being negotiated and a difficult with iran. as the relationship runs into trouble over ukraine, the department said that russia is good at compartmentalizing these issues and can focus on one or the other. these are personal. there is a breech of trust here. also to jill's point. i think it's important. president obama lnchsed this. offering in effect an off-ramp saying you have your concerns in the eastern part of the country. let's address the concerns so that one, to remove that excuse if it needs an excuse to allow the troops to come in. also a face saving move.
. senator, thank you very much for joining us today. as you know from our own jim miklaszewski and interviews with martin dempsey, the joint chiefs chairman and what the president has said to karzai, we are not going to wait for anything further from him, we have given up on him. so what happens if we end up withdrawing all troops from afghanistan? >> it could be a problem. i mean, in terms of just the security in afghanistan, the troops there, their forces have improved a great deal. they are miles ahead of where they were just a few years ago, but are they going to be able to resist a kind of hit-and-run guerilla war by the taliban. and the other issue is counter terrorism and what our basis is there. this is a real problem and the president is doing a real thing by calling karzai's bluff. he left the door open, though, there's a presidential election coming up in a couple months, and the new president might be ready to sign this thing. the irony is they had this convention of the whole leadership of the whole country, and they said yes to the whole deal. and now karzai, i do
goes away. is he talks about democrats because they were the original pro-slavery, pro-jim crow racists. >> they have moved beyond it. joe can say that and you couldn't. >> but why? >> he could say that and it would be funny. >> you could do it, but you would be lynched. equal. >> bob, bob. let's just -- you didn't mean that, bob. >> i meant it. no, you can't jump. >> i got a vertical jump higher. >> this is the problem with you guys. >> directly ahead -- >> i can jump. >> some muslims very upset at a new song -- >> what, bob? what is wrong with him? >> and later, jeopardy back at winning again, using his controversial strategy. alex trebek will be here to weigh in on the so-called evil jun genius. don't go away. you don't want to miss it. >>> top superstar katy perry under fire for the muslim community for this controversial scene from her new music video for her hit song "dark horse." watch. ♪ >> all right. in case you missed it, this was part of the video. has upset her muslim critics accusing her of, quote, blasp m blasphemy because it shows a pendant inscribed with the world all
. >> two pulitzer winning journalists discussed this issue, jim risen was jailed for refusing his source on government security. >> if we cannot provide confidentiality, and if that confidentiality can be threatened in court, then they will not be willing to go -- to reveal what's going wrong in the government. >> that issue between the press and the government yielded a surprising result in reporters without borders latest world press freedom index. for more than a decade, the organization has sent questionnaires to selected researchers and human rights activists in 100 countries. media independence, the environment in which reporters work and transparency, to affect news gathering. this year fin hand, the netherlands and norway lead the list. but the u.s., regarded by many as the world's leading democracy, ranked 46, one rung above haiti. sandy baron questions the low rating for the u.s. >> i think overall american journalists have very powerful protections, not the least of which is the general respect for rule of law in this country. the general respect for free press. >> a lot of pe
a range of options, jim, including loan guarantees to support ukraine economically. the next step is for the new government to resume talks with the imf, and as the government engages imf, we will take steps in ordination with multilateral and bilateral partners, as well as the new government. >> in the latest disclosure based on the leaks of edward snowden, "the guardian" reports britain's spy agency gchq intercepted millions of people's webcam chats and stored still images of them. the surveillance program, codenamed optic nerve, saved one image every five minutes from randomly selected yahoo webcam chats and stored them on agency databases. gchq collected images from the webcam chats of more than 1.8 million users globally in a six-month period in 2008 alone. many of the images were sexually explicit. more after headlines. were iraq, 51 people planted on aa bomb minibus killed five civilians. over 1005 hundred 60 people have been killed so far this year in iraq, with 680 killed since the beginning of february. israeli forces opened fire and killed a palestinian man thursday aft
correspondent jim sciutto. there's so many policies and cultures. it seems far away but it isn't. >> ukraine is in europe, kiev is miles away from rome, paris, london, that kind of thing and we have u.s. allies just to the west, poland, slovakia, hungary, romania. the u.s. is required to defend these countries militarily if they come under threat. >> crimea, appropriately colored red. why? >> because it has that pull toward russia. russia, right on the tip of russia, it's the headquarters of their black sea fleet, their on warm water port, all of the ports up here are cold, they don't have access to them in the winter. this is key. it's key when those thousands of russian troops moved into crimea, it where they went. >> people will remember this place throughout history. you had famous things happening here as part of its separation, we were talking earlier, florence nightingale. >> that's right, long ties between this part of the world and seems a million miles away in europe. >> the charge of the light brigade back in the 1850s. this went against the wrong front there and it proved very co
freedom. lease join me in welcoming jim carafano. [applause] >> thank you. i'm going to be extremely brief so we can get right to the top of. i want to start with a thank you but i want to thank our panelists, chris, kim and michael o'hanlon. put this together on the fly yesterday. i want to thank all of you for coming out in this but we thought this is such a critical issue as you're trying to follow over the weekend of a lot of people talking about a lot of things that nobody had chance to catch their breath. and have a dialogue. and i think this is an enormous opportunity with three preseason and listen been looking at these issues in studying this part of the world for a long time. to actually have a deep breath and a kind of reasoned, principled discussion about what's happened, what does it mean, where are we going from your and what are our options. i couldn't be more thrilled at these guys are jumping into do this. chris is the executive director at the foreign policy institute. kim holmes is a distinguished fellow, long distance grew not just your heritage but also at the u.s. sta
here optimistic. thank you very much. >> thank you, jim. excellent job. >> jed, foreign policy analysts at the heritage foundation discussed recent developments in ukraine, including rush military intervention and efforts to impose sanctions on vladmir putin's government. this is an hour 10 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. so i'm going to be extremely brief so we get right to the topic. i want to start with a thank you. i want to thank our panelists, chris, kim, michael hammond who tried to put this together on the fly yesterday. i want to thank all of you for coming out. but we thought this is such a critical issue. if you're trying to follow something on the weekend a lot of people were stalking about a lot of things but nobody had kind after chance to catch their breath and have a dialogue. this is see norm news opportunity with three very seasoned analysts, who are looking at these issues and studying this part of the world for a long time and have a deep breath, and have reasoned principled discussion what happened, what does it mean, where are we going from here and what are our
, groups like the fellowship, family research council. describes senator jim inhofe, perhaps most anti gay politician, as sort of a mentor and hero. and he is has studied in the united states. these ideas are being sort of broadcast overseas and amplified and taken to a whole new level in uganda. >> inhofe, by the way, we checked with him. he says, you know, he's -- had nothing to do with this legislation. he rejects it. he says i certainly disagree with the controversial legislation that uganda may enact in the coming days. and as i've said before, it is my hope that the country will abandon this unjust and harsh legislation. similar statement coming from other evangelical groups saying it's one thing to be anti gay, if you will. but it's another thing to say that gay people should spend the rest of their lives in jail or even be executed for engaging in homosexual activity. so it seems to me, and correct me if i am wrong, that there may have been some inspiration. but what they're doing in uganda goes far beyond what some of these evangelical groups may have wanted. >> i think you're exa
to find it just for you right here on "mad money." i'm jim cramer and i will see you monday! >>> the world came to russia for the olympic games and inactivity condemnation from nations around the world and the united states will stand with the international community in affirming there will be costs for any miltd intervention in the ukraine. >> did president obama draw another red line? did he threaten vladimir putin? he spoke out just two hours ago on the deteriorating situation in ukraine. news of russian troops on the ground spooked the markets and the rest of the west much we'll have a live report just ahead. >>> national outrage grows over new york city mayor de blasio's decision to pull the plug on high performing charter schools. millions of minority families see charter schools as the only way out of educational and economic poverty. >>> a new study seems to show sec staffers are selling stocks just before sec investigations of those companies are announced. either way, here's the big question. why are sec staffers allowed to trade individual stocks at all? all those stories much m
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